Background

The Global Goals

2030 global development agenda

193 countries

17 goals

Background

Human beings today are living like the last inhabitants of earth.  As a race, we are pursuing economic advancements at a great cost to the planet. 2016 has been confirmed as the hottest year on record.  This is according to a consolidated analysis by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and is consistent with findings by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate: global warming of more than 2°C would have serious consequences, such as low-lying island nations being submerged under water, super-charged droughts and storms and a third of species being put at risk for extinction. All this would stall and then reverse the economic gains made over the past two decades.

In December 2015, 195 countries reached an agreement to ensure that the global temperature does not increase by over 2 ºC by the end of this century thereby consenting to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).  Driven by the UN, the SDGs are a set of 17 global goals with 169 indicators that governments are expected to adopt.  Driven by the UN, the SDGs are a set of 17 global goals that governments are expected to adopt.  They set the 2030 global development agenda with a view to ending poverty, combating climate change and fighting justice and inequality.

The Kenyan Government has picked five key areas from the SDGs to guide its development for the next 15 years.  These include:

  1. Agriculture and Food Security
  2. Health
  3. Universal Education
  4. Employment and Enterprise
  5. Environment

Implementation these goals means moving the SDGs from decisions to actions.

What is My Little Big Thing?

Young people are drivers of change in local communities.  They work for social development through activism, social movements and creative expressions. With the right support, young people can transform the world into a better place for all.

In line with Kenya’s development goals, MK-Africa – in partnership with KPMG and the University of Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership, South Africa (CISL SA) – is running an SDGs challenge targetting university students across the country.  Inspired by Wangari Maathai’s ‘little thing’ of planting trees, the competition aims to come up with the kind of simple ideas that will have a big impact.  The competition is challenging university students to develop simple ideas that are commercially viable that will contribute to the implementation of the SDGs in Kenya. Running from May 2017, the competition targets undergraduate students from universities and polytechnics across Kenya.

Objectives

  1. Identify sustainability ideas that are commercially viable
  2. Contribute to sponsor company goals
  3. Fulfil Kenya’s SDGs commitments

WHY YOUTH

Drivers of change in local communities.
Work for social development through activism, social movements and creative expressions.
With right support, young people can transform the world into a better place for all.